March 2022: A Home to Return To

Nothing says hope like a patch of yellow crocus flowers after a long winter. It’s a sign of new beginnings, of something better on the horizon, even while we trudge through the real and metaphorical muck of winter. For some insight into what spring has in store, read on.

The Story: Finding the Anchor in the Storm

The Jump Off

Our homes are the hubs of our lives. Our shelter, our refuge, our sanctuary. A home to return to is something that many of us take for granted. It’s hard to imagine them being taken from us. Yet, watching this world crisis unfold, we are seeing just that and it’s left many of us feeling frozen, unsure how to proceed.

The Process

Uncertainty stops any market in its tracks. Especially the real estate market. We’re seeing a trend towards folks holding off on listing new inventory — sellers are worried about their ability to cash out during a year that’s already seen so many twists and turns. Buyers are worried about making the biggest purchase of their lives in uncertain times, and the need to commit to one location for five or more years in order to break even. Still, no matter what is going on in the world, we need a place to call home. Everyone deserves that.

The Wrap Up

It’s impossible to time the market. You cannot control the world stage. And while rising interest rates and shrinking stock portfolios obviously determine so much, what matters even more is the emotional pull of home. The need for that security, that anchor in the storm. All you have control over is yourself, and making the decision that makes sense for you.

The Cheat Sheet

It’s easy to feel powerless, but there are ways to make a contribution. If you’re feeling the need to get calm and centered, a little gardening therapy never hurts. And since March is Women’s History Month, consider treating the women in your life with a piece from these female-owned brands.

The Gabriele Moment: The Daytona 500

There is nothing like the thrilling escapism of the iconic NASCAR season opener. This year, sitting so close to the racetrack, the cars whizzing by in a deafening wave of sound, my eyes could barely register single cars. Bumper to bumper, they sped by in a blur, ending in a thrilling overtime finish that left me speechless. It’s easy to see why it’s called the Great American Race. At the outset, there’s that feeling of potential, that anyone can win. There’s the collective gasp of emotion when a car goes airborne and turns upside down. There’s the outcry of the crowd cheering on the racers, channeling all the pent-up energy of the last two years into this one dizzying event that’s a welcome (and much needed) adventure for racers and spectators alike.

Share The Joy

Know someone considering a move or an investment? Please forward this newsletter to your family and friends — most of my business comes by word of mouth! I truly appreciate every one of your referrals. Thank you.

Instagram | Website | Video | Listings |NYC Vignettes | gsewtz@compass.com

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Mom, wife, and top-producing real estate broker at Compass, passionate Brooklynite. www.sewtz.com

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Gabriele Sewtz

Gabriele Sewtz

Mom, wife, and top-producing real estate broker at Compass, passionate Brooklynite. www.sewtz.com

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